Satay Baked Tofu and Sweet Potato with Kale and Coriander

May 29, 2016

Satay Baked Tofu and Sweet Potato with Kale and Coriander | A comforting and easy baked dinner that's gluten free and vegan!

What are your favourite things to eat when the weather takes a sudden turn? The last week down here in Melbourne has been very cold, with lots of rain and wind. We had a (slightly concerningly) warm May, so I’m not sure if this weather is what it usually is this time or year, or whether it just feels cold in comparison. Either way, K and I have been enjoying lots of steel cut oats, lentil soup and baked meals like this one.

Often the food I make day-to-day in my kitchen was once inspired by a recipe from a book. What I often cook now is something that doesn’t quite resemble the original – having evolved and manifested itself with different flavours and ingredients. This recipe is an example of that occurrence – I have cooked a particular pumpkin, potato and tofu bake from Heidi Swanson’s Super Natural Everyday many times since first receiving that book as a gift, and, whilst I can see the direct correlation between this meal and that one, the only real similarity is the treatment of the veg and the addition of kale and coriander. But such is the joy of cooking – with each new meal we cook we learn something new about how we can apply certain techniques or use a new combination of ingredients. Our food is constantly shape-shifting, in our own kitchens as well as within communities. This ever-changing factor is what makes the food world an interesting and inspiring place to situate oneself.

This tofu and sweet potato bake is slathered in a peanut satay sauce – so it is flavoursome, nourishing, and full of protein. Lots of lemon juice brightens up this dish and balances the natural sweetness of the roasted potatoes and onions. It’s got a few handfuls of kale and coriander for good measure, making this a nutritious warm meal on its own or with some steamed rice. Perfect for a cold night, great as leftovers for lunch.

I’m going to leave you with this daring assertion and tell you that there is only one kale really worth using, and that is cavelo nero. Too bold? Am I making enemies? I’m sorry curly kale, but it’s tuscan or bust for me. With its beautiful dimpled leaves, its green blue hue and it’s ability to stand up to bold flavours, it is my preferred kale and the only one I buy. Of course, feel free to use your favourite green leafy veg here if it’s hard to come by. xxSatay Baked Tofu and Sweet Potato with Kale and Coriander | A comforting and easy baked dinner that's gluten free and vegan!

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Baked Rhubarb Steel Cut Oats with Orange and Pistachio

May 16, 2016

Baked Rhubarb Steel Cut Oats with Orange and Pistachio | A beautiful spring or autumn breakfast for cool mornings. Vegan, gluten free and refined sugar free.

This is always a funny time of the year – when rhubarb is both in season down here in Melbourne and in the Northern Hemisphere at the same time. I can see everyone online going spring rhubarb crazy, pairing it with new season strawberries and using it in warm weather recipes. Whilst we have rhubarb later in the year (our spring) we also have it now at the end of autumn, where it is delicious combined with apples and roasted in cold weather dishes. I’m not sure if we’re just lucky that rhubarb seems to grow so well here, or if it shows up at other times of the year on the other side of the world too. Either way, it fills me with lots of glee when we can make the same recipes at the same time as our friends North side.

This little number I have been tweaking for the past few weeks – trying different fruit and flavour combinations. Many have been delicious, but this one is a particular favourite: a baked porridge (oatmeal) recipe using steel cut oats, layered with rhubarb, spiked with orange zest and studded with plenty of pistachios. It’s sweetened with just a little coconut sugar to counter balance the tartness of the rhubarb, and a little maple is a delicious addition to drizzle on top when serving.

I absolutely love steel cut oats. I feel that they are in a league entirely of their own, leaving rolled oats in the dust. They’re chewy, substantial, and not as gluggy as the latter. Also called pinhead or Irish oats, they are made by cutting the whole oat groat with metal blades into 2 or 3 pieces (hence, “steel cut”). This causes them to cook quicker than whole groats, but still have that chewy whole grain feeling. The only downside is that they should really be soaked overnight to make them quicker to cook. That said, it’s a good idea to soak any oats overnight to aid your digestion, so it’s no biggie really!

Feel free to substitute in any seasonal fruit you have available if rhubarb isn’t – thinly sliced apple or pear, berries, stone fruit. A variety of nuts and seeds could also be used here. If you have access to Bob’s Red Mill brand, I know he sells gluten free steel cut oats. There are probably other brands too, if you need it to be gluten free.

Baked Rhubarb Steel Cut Oats with Orange and Pistachio | A beautiful spring or autumn breakfast for cool mornings. Vegan, gluten free and refined sugar free.

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Warm Banoffee Chia Parfait

May 2, 2016

Warm Banoffee Chia Parfait | A delicious peanut butter chia pudding topped with a layer of warm banana caramel! A sweet vegan breakfast or a decadent dessert. Paleo, gluten free, refined sugar free.
I love chia puddings in the warmer weather, eating them for breakfast throughout summer and early autumn with fresh fruit and yoghurt. But now that we are having cooler mornings, I have been layering them with warm fruit compotes instead – what feels like an indulgence but is actually deceptively healthy!

In this version you’ll find a creamy peanut butter chia pudding, topped with a warm banana caramel – sweetened with maple syrup and coconut sugar. It’s flavour is reminiscent of banoffee pie (which you may remember I’ve made before), which can only be a good thing!  Serve as it is for a delicious and wholesome breakfast, or with the adorning toppings for a decadent breakfast or dessert. 

You can make the chia base the night before, and just make the banana caramel when you’re ready to serve it. That said, you can also make the caramel the night before too, and assemble it for a cold, make-ahead breakfast. I love the warm caramel during the colder months, but I’m sure it’d go down a treat as a cold pudding in the summer heat. Xx

Warm Banoffee Chia Parfait | A delicious peanut butter chia pudding topped with a layer of warm banana caramel! A sweet vegan breakfast or a decadent dessert. Paleo, gluten free, refined sugar free.

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Paprika & Cumin Roasted New Potatoes with Coriander Aioli

April 25, 2016

Paprika & Cumin Roasted New Potatoes with Coriander Aioli | Delicious crispy potatoes with a creamy vegan aioli. Paleo, gluten free, dairy free.This has to be my favourite way to season potatoes. My partner invented the flavour combination some time last year, on a whim. He grew up in a house where he wasn’t encouraged to help out with cooking, which has meant that he has had to learn a lot of the basic skills (that I take for granted) as an adult. It’s never too late to learn though, and he makes up for his lack of skill confidence with his enthusiasm for flavour experimentation! Since he made this combination, we have been using it pretty much every time we roast potatoes – it’s that good, seriously. Something about the sweetness of the paprika with the heady savouriness of the cumin.

Here I’ve served them a bit like loaded fries, covered in a garlicky aioli that has a good dose of coriander and lemon. It’s a lovely creamy sauce and it’s flavour is reminiscent of an avocado and cottage cheese dip that my father use to make us as kids (he’s a big garlic fan). I like the little bursts of cherry tomatoes and a bit of freshness from the additional coriander… Totally optional though. In fact, these potatoes are amazing just as they are, aioli free. Quite a common side in our house (probably weekly, if I’m honest), I often serve them alongside a soup like this one. And if someone was to serve them with good ol’ tomato sauce (ketchup), I wouldn’t complain either. There’s a reason we go through a kilo of potatoes a week! xx
Paprika & Cumin Roasted New Potatoes with Coriander Aioli | Delicious crispy potatoes with a creamy vegan aioli. Paleo, gluten free, dairy free.

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Roasted Butternut and Garlic Soup with Sage and Hazelnuts

April 18, 2016

Roasted Butternut and Garlic Soup with Sage and Hazelnut | A rich and hearty vegan soup that is creamy despite being dairy-free. Healthy and warming.

Sometimes life gets in the way. It can get a little overwhelming, like people are pulling you in different directions, needing your attention. Sometimes it’s just you though, and it’s your own expectations of what you should be able to accomplish in a given week. Sometimes everything gets too much and it feels like you don’t have enough time, and when that happens – I make soup! The best meal to make when leftovers are the perfect gift for your future self.

Yes, I realise this is the second soup I’ve posted in a row (!) but this is what I am currently making in my kitchen… So I’m going to share it with you! It is substantially different than the lentil soup I posted last, but no less satisfying. This is a super tasty pumpkin soup, totally autumnal in flavour.

As I’ve said before regarding pumpkin soup, I really need there to be a lot going on for me to not find it too samey and cloyingly sweet. Like my previous (pretty damn popular) Turmeric Pumpkin Soup, this one is loaded with other flavours, much of which counterbalances the sweetness of the butternut pumpkin. For starters, there’s the roasted garlic – so much umami/savoury goodness! Secondly, it’s topped with toasted hazelnuts and sage, both which have bitter flavours that match well with pumpkin. It’s brightened with a little orange zest, and has a little spicy note from black pepper and freshly grated nutmeg. It’s complex flavoured, and has interest from the crunchy hazelnut topping – no boring pumpkin soup here!

I like soups to be a full meal (who wants to cook twice? I’m not organised enough for that!) so I am always sure to add protein to the mix. This baby has white beans blended into it – totally unnoticeable, and it adds a creamy richness without the use of dairy. I use cannelini beans here, but any cooked white bean will do (and from a can is also fine).

This soup comes together simply and relatively quick, and is more of an assembly job if anything. Once you’ve roasted the pumpkin (which intensifies the flavour) and garlic, the soup is blended and ready in 5 minutes. Definitely weeknight friendly, but also a lovely weekend autumn meal for a day at home.

Just a quick end note: don’t be worried about the amount of garlic called for it the recipe, the result is a surprisingly mellow flavour brought about through roasting the cloves whole in the oven. See you next week for a not-so-soupy recipe :) xx

Roasted Butternut and Garlic Soup with Sage and Hazelnut | A rich and hearty vegan soup that is creamy despite being dairy-free. Healthy and warming.

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Everyday Lentil Soup with Saffron Yoghurt

April 5, 2016

Everyday Lentil Soup with Saffron Yoghurt | An easy and versatile weekday meal that's super satisfying and flavoursome. Vegan, gluten free.

I love to include recipes here on Homespun Capers that feature on high rotation in my own kitchen – I feel like they’re the ones worth sharing, because they’re the ones I always comes back to time and time again. This is such a recipe – it’s a super easy and versatile soup that I make about once a week during the cooler months. I always adjust the spices and toppings to what I feel like and what I’ve got on hand, but this particular topping of saffron yoghurt makes this everyday lentil soup pretty darn special. People often turn their noses up at the idea of lentil soup, saying it’s boring and ho-hum… But to them I say this: you have obviously never had a good lentil soup. This little number is flavoursome, rich, filling and satisfying. This, my friends, is the one you’ve been waiting for.

This is the last instalment in my suite of delicious autumn immune boosting recipes, and I hope they have inspired you with some different ways to strengthen your body for this time of year. There’s a few different ingredients in this soup that are worth talking about in terms of their health properties. Firstly, lentils are a powerhouse of iron, guaranteed to power you through winter! They are also an excellent prebiotic (which I wrote about last week here), so are fantastic for your immune system when combined with this probiotic saffron yoghurt. Saffron, to start with, is a natural anti-depressant, so it’s a perfect addition to your diet throughout winter when S.A.D. starts setting in. It’s also high in magnesium and vitamin C, so it helps your body fight against infection. Finally, a good dose of cayenne pepper to increase circulation and garlic to bring some anti-bacterial and cold and flu fighting properties to this soup. phew!

Talking about the health properties of foods sometimes make us feel like it is the only reason we should bother eating them. But rest assured, friends, I would never suggest to eat anything that doesn’t taste amazing! These healthful ingredients I’ve been focussing on these past weeks are all full of wonderful flavours, and are all worth eating in their own right! There’s nothing better for the body and soul than eating something delicious, nourishing and satisfying… Or should I say “Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food”? xx

Titbit: Saffron (crocus sativus) is a purple flowering plant from the iris family, whose flowers each hold three red stigmas (threads) that are harvested for use as a spice. Saffron was originally grown for use as a clothing dye – the prized alfa-crocin (a compound that gives the spice its golden hue) has since been found to also contain anti-oxidant, anti-depressant, and anti-cancer properties. When used in food, saffron has a bittersweet taste and heady fragrance, lending itself to a variety of dishes from Spainish paella to Indian kulfi. Native to South West Asia, Saffron is the worlds most expensive spice due to its high labor and low yield – it takes 4,500 flowers to make one ounce of saffron spice.

Everyday Lentil Soup with Saffron Yoghurt | An easy and versatile weekday meal that's super satisfying and flavoursome. Vegan, gluten free.

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Magic Miso Almond Sauce on Steamed Greens and New Potatoes

March 28, 2016

Magic Miso Almond Sauce on Steamed Greens and New Potatoes | Immune boosting probitioc and prebiotic almond butter and miso sauce! Super tasty and easy alternative to satay. Vegan, quick, gluten free

Hi! Still here and still talking about what foods we can include in our diet to strengthen our immune systems. I’m super excited to share this recipe with you today! It’s an immune boosting sauce that is crazy tasty, so quick to make and amazingly versatile! It’s like a satay that requires no cooking whatsoever, and it’s served here gado gado style over steamed greens and new potatoes. It’s salty, sweet and sour, and perfectly savoury. It’s made from a combination of prebiotic almond butter and probiotic miso… Say wha? Most people have heard the term probiotic thrown around, especially recently, but what is a prebiotic? Let’s back up a bit!

A probiotic food contains millions of tiny good bacteria/organisms that colonise your body and are beneficial for your gut health, affecting many parts of your body including your immune system and nervous system… Think yoghurt, lacto-fermented pickles like sauerkraut, kombucha, and unpasturised miso. Prebiotics, on the other hand, are foods that produce the ideal environment in your gut for probiotics to thrive… I think so them as food for probiotics. Basically, any part of your food that make it through your digestive tracks (undigested) to your large intestine and colon are considered prebiotics – mainly dietary fibre that is resistant to digestive enzymes. Some great prebiotic foods include onions (cooked and raw), garlic, bananas, asparagus and other green veg, whole grains, beans, and almonds.

So, the great thing about this easy recipe is that it contains both probiotic miso, and prebiotic almond butter and garlic. You’re giving those probiotics a chance at sticking around in your gut by giving them the food to do so. Even better when it’s served over lots of steamed green veggies! This is a super versatile sauce that you can use on sandwiches, with tofu, thinned out to dress greens… You get the idea. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

Titbit: Miso, a Japanese fermented soybean paste most commonly used in soup, comes in a variety of colours, grain types and strengths. It’s made by steaming soybeans and a grain, adding a starter called Koaji, then fermenting it in cedar for 18 months – 2 years. This fermentations turns the proteins and carbohydrates in the soybeans and grain into easily digestible amino and fatty acids, and creates living enzymes and good bacteria. The flavour of miso is umami / extremely savoury, and often an acquired taste. The taste can vary from light and sweet (shiro – shortly fermented white rice miso) to dark and rich (hatcho – a dark miso made without grains), with each miso having a different flavour and use in Japanese culture. It’s great for adding flavour depth to plant-based soups, marinades, dressings. I recommend always adding miso incrementally, tasting as you go – you will find you are able to add more light miso to a recipe than dark. When making soup, it’s best to add the miso once you have taken it off the bowl, so you don’t destroy the beneficial enzymes and bacteria. It’s also a good idea to get unpasturised miso where possible, as pasteurisation can also remove a lot of the nutritional benefits.

Also! A quick note to say: you’ve probably noticed Homespun Capers has had a little facelift this week! It’s a bit of a work in progress, but any feedback you have on its usability is greatly appreciated… Hope you like it! xx Liberty

Magic Miso Almond Sauce on Steamed Greens and New Potatoes | Immune boosting probitioc and prebiotic almond butter and miso sauce! Super tasty and easy alternative to satay. Vegan, quick, gluten free

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Things I Love (March 2016)

March 25, 2016

Mushroom, Leek and Thyme Rosti Pie by Homespun Capers

This month has been all about boosting my immune system, ready for winter down here in the Southern Hemisphere. The last couple of recipes I’ve posted have been all about strengthening your body with food as medicine, and I have a few more in the coming weeks – I hope you’ve been enjoying them so far. If you’re heading into spring, it doesn’t mean you can’t nurture you’re immune system… The change of seasons can really knock about your body, regardless of whether it’s warming up or cooling down. I’ve included a few other suggestions of immune boosting recipes from fellow bloggers below, but firstly… Here’s what’s been of interest this year so far…

I have a recipe for a Mushroom, Leek and Thyme Rösti Pie in Design Sponge! (pictured above).

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Ginger Peanut Tofu Curry

March 14, 2016

Ginger Peanut Tofu Curry | A weeknight-friendly and immune boosting dinner for the change of seasons. Creamy, spicy, protein-packed! Vegan and gluten free.Here is the second instalment in my suite of immune-boosting recipes, ready to steel us against the change of seasons and get us winter proof. It’s a protein-packed little number that easily fits into your weeknight dinner repertoire, and it’s loaded with the good stuff!

I think of this Ginger Peanut Tofu Curry as the marriage between a tomato-based curry and satay sauce… But without the sugar. Sound strange? It’s deliciously creamy and nutty, with just a hint of chilli and incredibly warming from the fresh ginger root and turmeric. My favourite part? The tofu is baked first, giving it texture and body to stand up to such a sauce. Genius, right? Can’t take credit, this curry is inspired by a recipe in Bryant Terry’s new cookbook Afro-Vegan – his finest work yet! Based on the flavours of Tanzanian fish curry, the sauce needs to be in your winter arsenal of flu-fighting, immune-boosting recipes to see you through the cold nights that are a comin’.

Titbit: Ginger (zingiber officinale) is a flowering plant that has arhizome/root commonly used in both culinary and medicinal purposes. A native to India (who is still the largest producer of ginger globally), it was exported to Europe in the first century AD where it was used extensively by the Romans. Most commonly used to aid digestion and nausea, ginger is great for many parts of the body. The anti-viral and anti-bacterial nature of ginger makes it perfect to include during the cooler months, as well as its ability to warm the body by raising circulation and cleanse the blood. Whilst ginger can be bought dried , powdered, as oil, tinctures or extracts, most herbalists recommend using fresh ginger for maximum benefits.

I love to share music so here is a song to cook by.

Ginger Peanut Tofu Curry | A weeknight-friendly and immune boosting dinner for the change of seasons. Creamy, spicy, protein-packed! Vegan and gluten free.

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Golden Turmeric Yoghurt Bowl

March 7, 2016

Golden Turmeric Yoghurt Bowl | A immune-boosting breakfast spin on the popular golden milk (turmeric tea)! Creamy, slightly sweet, spiced coconut yoghurt. Vegan, paleo, gluten free, grain free, dairy free.

The first week of Autumn has been a hot one, with the thermostat pushing 30C on most days, and this week should be the same. But despite the warmer weather, I found myself coming down with a cold only a month after finishing my last one. This recipe was born out of a desire to improve my immune system before the cold actually sets in, and all the turmeric I’ve eaten whilst recipe testing seems to have worked a treat!

Inspired by my very popular Warming Turmeric Tea (or golden milk) recipe, this breakfast bowl brings turmeric into your morning ritual. This yoghurt is lightly spiced and just-sweet-enough, and is great paired with some sweet and tart seasonal fruit. I use coconut milk yoghurt here, because I love the creaminess and find the flavour is complemented by turmeric – feel free to use your favourite unsweetened yoghurt.

For the next month I’ll be sharing immune-boosting recipes here on Homespun Capers, and I hope they’ll prove helpful to you wherever you are in the world. Regardless of whether you’re coming into spring or autumn, the change of season can knock your immune system a little whilst the weather settles into its next routine. Even if you’re not someone who gets sick regularly, there’s no harm in including more turmeric in your diet – with it’s host of health properties, what’s to lose? xx

Titbit: Turmeric (curcuma longa) is a potent spice, which grows as a rhizome and is from the same family as ginger. You can buy it as either a fresh root (to grate) and also the more common dried ground spice. Well known for its bright yellow colour, turmeric has an earthy taste and heady muskiness. It can be used in both sweet and savoury contexts, the latter being more common. Used originally as a dye, the name of the genus curcuma is an arabic word that is used for both saffron and turmeric – two spices that share a similar colour and ability to stain. Turmeric’s active compound Curcumin is touted to be a superfood – its scientifically proven to be anti-inflammatory for the body, cancer fighting, mood enhancing and boosts your immune system against infection (to name just a few). A native to South West India, where turmeric is also used topically on insect bites and stings, and is one of the base spices for curries.  It is important to consume turmeric with both fat and black pepper (active compound Piperine) both of which enable your body’s absorption and use of the precious Curcumin .

Golden Turmeric Yoghurt Bowl | Homespun Capers

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